Tips for Better Sleep

Whether caused by stress, physical changes or environmental factors, statistics show that an estimated 50 to 70 million Americans suffer from sleep problems. To better address these problems, it is helpful to understand how the body processes sleep.

In this post, we will explore the different stages of sleep and the consequences of sleep deprivation. We’ll also suggest some good habits to start before bed to achieve better sleep, and discuss how participating in a sleep study can help diagnose certain problems. Finally, learn where to get help if you need sleep treatment.

The stages of sleep

Many people who have trouble falling asleep or sleeping through the night but don’t wake up feeling rested ask themselves, “Do I need better sleep? The answer is most likely “yes,” but to be sure, it is helpful to understand the different phases the body goes through during a normal night’s rest. The first three phases are called non-rapid eye movement (NREM) and the fourth phase is called rapid eye movement (REM).

Phase 1

You have your eyes closed, but you could still wake up easily. This NREM phase lasts only 5 to 10 minutes.

Phase 2

This phase lasts a little longer – about 10 to 25 minutes. During this time, your body temperature drops and your heart rate slows. The brain also begins to experience sleep spindles, which are essentially fast, rhythmic brain waves.

Stage 3

During this stage, your blood pressure and breathing rate decrease, and your muscles relax. It is the transitional stage between light and deep sleep. After this stage, you easily return to stage 2 before entering stage 4.

Stage 4

In REM sleep, your body becomes immobile and relaxes completely, your eyes move rapidly while your brain becomes more active and dreams occur. This is the deepest stage of sleep, and before you wake up, your body returns to stage 2.

The consequences of sleep deprivation

For optimal health, every adult should sleep seven to nine hours a night. Sleeping less than 7 hours is considered sleep deprivation, which can lead to physical and mental complications.

There are numerous causes of sleep deprivation, including lifestyle changes, travel, sleep disorders and illness. It is important to identify if you are affected by sleep deprivation so that you can avoid the consequences, which may include the following

Deterioration of the immune system
Weight gain
Diabetes
Pain


Mental health disorders

Higher susceptibility to accidents
Any or all of these conditions can lead to a lower quality of life and a higher risk of premature death. The good news is that there are ways to reduce the risk of sleep deprivation and prepare your body for better rest.

Sleep-promoting habits before bed


If you struggle with sleep issues, you’re probably wondering what you can do to get more sleep. Here are some proven healthy habits you can develop to help you sleep better:

Make your bedroom a sanctuary for sleep. Set up your bedroom only for restful activities like reading or sleeping. Avoid using electronic devices and keep the lighting and temperature low.

Move around 5 hours (or sooner) before bedtime. This will help your body recover in time to sleep when needed.

Whether caused by stress, physical changes or environmental factors, statistics show that an estimated 50 to 70 million Americans suffer from sleep problems. To better address these problems, it is helpful to understand how the body processes sleep.

In this post, we will explore the different stages of sleep and the consequences of sleep deprivation. We’ll also suggest some good habits to start before bed to achieve better sleep, and discuss how participating in a sleep study can help diagnose certain problems. Finally, learn where to get help if you need sleep treatment.

The stages of sleep

Many people who have trouble falling asleep or staying asleep but don’t wake up feeling rested ask themselves, “Do I need better sleep? The answer is most likely “yes,” but to be sure, it is helpful to understand the different phases the body goes through during a normal night’s rest. The first three phases are called non-rapid eye movements (NREM) and the fourth phase is called rapid eye movement (REM).

Phase 1

You have your eyes closed, but you can still wake up easily. This NREM phase lasts only 5 to 10 minutes.

Phase 2

This phase lasts a little longer – about 10 to 25 minutes. During this time, your body temperature drops and your heart rate slows. The brain also begins to experience sleep spindles, which are essentially fast, rhythmic brain waves.

Stage 3

In this stage, your blood pressure and breathing rate decrease, and your muscles relax. It is the transitional stage between light and deep sleep. After this stage, you easily return to stage 2 before entering stage 4.

Stage 4

In REM sleep, your body becomes immobile and relaxes completely, your eyes move rapidly while your brain becomes more active and dreams occur. This is the deepest stage of sleep, and before you wake up, your body returns to stage 2.

The consequences of sleep deprivation
For optimal health, every adult should sleep seven to nine hours a night. Sleeping less than 7 hours is considered sleep deprivation, which can lead to physical and mental complications.

There are numerous causes of sleep deprivation, including lifestyle changes, travel, sleep disorders and illness. It is important to determine if you are affected by sleep deprivation so that you can avoid the consequences, which may include the following

Deterioration of the immune system
Weight gain
Diabetes
Pain
Mental health disorders
Higher susceptibility to accidents

Any or all of these conditions can lead to a lower quality of life and a higher risk of premature death. The good news is that there are ways to reduce the risk of sleep deprivation and prepare your body for better rest.

Sleep-promoting habits before bed

If you struggle with sleep issues, you’re probably wondering what you can do to get more sleep. Here are some proven healthy habits you can develop to help you sleep better:

Make your bedroom a sanctuary for sleep. Set up your bedroom only for restful activities like reading or sleeping. Avoid using electronic devices and keep the lighting and temperature low.

Move around 5 hours (or sooner) before bedtime. This will help your body recover in time to sleep when needed.

If need any assistance can visit Neurology hospital in Dubai